Gaviota Floods

Massive Flooding at El Capitan Canyon leads to Evacuations for Sherpa Burn Area

In an urgent Message from the Office of Emergency Management: An Evacuation Warning has been issued for the greater Sherpa Fire Burn area by the Santa Barbara County Sheriff Department beginning 4 am Sunday. 

The Santa Barbara Independent covered the floods at El Capitan Canyon on January 20 that washed away five cabins and 15 cars, with more photos here in the story by Noozhawk. The LA Times has more photos, and the Santa Maria Times has video with rescue workers and gushing water. Here's more video from January 20 at El Capitan Canyon. People in the cabins and campground were rescued with a tracked vehicle, with tank-like treads.

In addition, the historic Orella adobes suffered extensive damage. Gaviota Coast Conservancy board member and descendant of the Presidio founder who built those homes, Guner Tautrim, shared his view from Orella Ranch on January 20, "Today was crazy!! We didn't experience the insane rain fall amounts or intensity but we sure suffered the effects of it. At my place we only measured 2" of rain total (all day) versus the 2" in an hour at Bobby's place. All that upslope rain on the fire-scarred terrain reeked havoc down here. El Cap is totally destroyed. Way way way worse then the fires. Carnage all up the canyon. And Corral Canyon - Las Floras (Exxon Mobil) got a major flushing as well. Sadly the historic Ortega adobes (my great-great-great-grandfather's house) got destroyed. A pile of debris. Venadito Canyon is pretty damaged as well, with lots of mud, blocked culverts and the like. To think more is coming is pretty scary."

Fellow Gaviota Coast resident Bobby Hazard reported on January 20, "Checking the County auto rain gauge at the top of the pass, we had 3 inches between 7 and 10pm, but 1.9 inches in one hour from 8-9. Amazing; it's never happened in my 40 years up here. The creek looks completely different in many places. As with many such things, there is a silver lining. Our springs are flowing after years of not and my neighbor's well has 30 feet more water in it than before. The creek that was choked with invasive growth is cleaned out and open to the sun. And Refugio Beach has lots of new sand."

From the SB County Office of Emergency Communications:

Following winter weather warnings from the National Weather Service for Santa Barbara County, an evacuation warning has been issued from the Santa Barbara County Sheriff for areas burned in the Sherpa Fire (June 2016) including El Capitan Canyon, El Capitan Ranch, El Capitan State Beach, Refugio State Beach, Refugio Canyon, Canada Venadito Canyon, del Coral, and Las Flores Canyon (see enclosed map).   The warning is in place for Sunday, January 22 beginning at 4 a.m. 

An evacuation warning means there is a strong likelihood that there will be a risk to life and property, and residents in the warning area should take this time to prepare to leave quickly if given a mandatory evacuation order. Time should be taken to gather family members, pets, valuables, and important paperwork/documents. An individual or family should be ready to leave at a moment’s notice. However, if anyone feels threatened, do not wait for an evacuation order – leave immediately. 

In addition, advisories issued today from the National Weather Service include a high wind warning in place through Monday, January 23, and a flash flood watch on Sunday, January 22 from the early morning until the afternoon for all areas of Santa Barbara County, not just the burn areas.

El Capitan and Refugio state parks are currently closed, as well as the northbound Hwy 101 off ramp at El Capitan.

The public is encouraged to avoid going out in the storm and to stay off the roads. As a precaution, do not walk through flood waters. It only takes six inches of moving water to knock you off your feet. If you are trapped by moving water, move to the highest possible point and call 911 for help. 

Do not drive into flooded roadways or around a barricade. Water may be deeper than it appears and can hide many hazards, such as sharp objects, washed out road surfaces, electrical wires, chemicals, etc. A vehicle caught in swiftly moving water can be swept away in a matter of seconds. Twelve inches of water can float a car or small SUV and 18 inches of water can carry away large vehicles. 

For updated information, visit www.countyofsb.org. Residents and visitors are strongly encouraged to sign up for “Aware and Prepare” alerts at www.awareandprepare.org.

The Santa Barbara County Emergency Operations Center has been activated as well as the Joint Information Center to provide county residents and visitors with updated information regarding flash flooding and debris flow hazards.

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Gaviota Coast declared Scenic Highway

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Gaviota Coast Conservancy played a major role 
Caltrans has officially designed the Gaviota Coast as a State Scenic Highway. Over the past year, Gaviota Coast Conservancy worked tirelessly with Caltrans, County staff and the Santa Barbara Board of Supervisors to make this happen. As stated by the Director of Caltrans, "the scenic qualities of this well-deserved section of California's coast will be preserved, so that they may continue to be appreciated and enjoyed by all."
Gaviota Coast Conservancy, along with Supervisor Doreen Farr, have long pushed for this overdue designation. The new Scenic Highway will extend along a 21-mile stretch of Highway 101, from Goleta's western boundary to Highway 1 at Las Cruces, where it will connect with another scenic route on Highway 1 between Las Cruces and Lompoc. For more detail, here's an article on the Gaviota Coast Scenic Highway designation in the Lompoc Record
Your Gaviota Coast Conservancy board continues to work diligently to help preserve the Gaviota Coast. This is one more step in that pursuit. We are most proud and pleased to have taken a leading role in this project, and look forward to continuing our work in the coming year. There will be a formal dedication in the near future. We will keep you informed, when the date is set. 
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Eastern Gaviota Update

Naples Townsite Project Status Report

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Today there are two active development proposals on the historic Naples townsite.

Between Paradiso’s two lots and the Santa Barbara Ranch project, lie 57 acres with 25 substandard “Naples Townsite” lots. Owned by the Paradiso developers and formerly the western end of the Arco-Dos Pueblos Golf Course, the lands are bounded by Cañada Tomate and the Paradiso project to the east, Highway 101 to the north, the Santa Barbara Ranch fence line to the west, and the Pacific Ocean to the south. Developers propose to build seven large houses on these lands – four between the ocean and the railroad, and three between the railroad and Highway 101. These former oilfield lands have high quality habitat that includes wetlands, native grasslands, white-tailed kites and grasshopper sparrows. The entire site is visually prominent when you are traveling along Highway 101 and the railroad.

The CBAR (Central Board of Architectural Review) conceptually reviewed the developer’s preliminary designs for the seven proposed homes earlier this year. If you drive by the site, you’ll see that the developer is currently drilling shallow wells to test septic system suitability. The project’s full development application is expected to be submitted to the County in early 2017. It will be a two- to three-year process that will include preparation of an EIR, a public comment period, and County processing of permits through the Planning Commission, Board of Supervisors and Coastal Commission. Gaviota Coast Conservancy and its ally, Surfrider Foundation, will scrutinize every detail of this project at every step of the way to prevent inappropriate development in this sensitive coastal area.

The public does not currently have a legal right to go onto these lands, but can view them from the Santa Barbara Ranch fence line (to get there, park on Dos Pueblos Canyon Road by the southbound 101 on-ramp and follow the trail around the gate and onto Langtry Avenue and over the railroad tracks, then veer left/east toward the fence line) or from the Seals Trail).

In another part of the Naples Townsite, a different developer is proposing development on lot numbers 66 and 69, relying on the 2008 Santa Barbara Ranch project preliminary approval that has not been finalized by the County or reviewed by the Coastal Commission. The developer has proposed to build two large homes on a bluff-top lot and a lot north of the railroad. This application remains incomplete, and will likely need an EIR before any development can be considered.

If you are interested in visiting the Naples area, the public can legally access Santa Barbara Ranch, with the exception of lots 66 and 69, by parking on Dos Pueblos Canyon Road by the southbound 101 on-ramp and following the trail around the gate and onto Langtry Ave. and over the railroad tracks down to the beach. The Seals trail also offers access from the fence along the southbound side of the freeway, across the railroad and west to the beach access path. Views of the Paradiso property are available from both Langtry Ave. and the Seals Trail, but the public cannot legally access the property itself.

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